Viewing entries tagged
Directing

Interview with Alfred Hitchcock

Interview with Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock was a pioneer director most known for directing Psycho. In this interview from 1972 (his death was in 1980) he discusses his career working with actors, story telling, and decision making in regards to directing.

Watch the full interview in the video below:

Apple Hires Steven Spielberg For Original TV Content

Apple Hires Steven Spielberg For Original TV Content

Apple has been selling TV shows and movies for a long time now. They have finally announced original content to take on Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, and Amazon. Being a bit late to the game theysure are coming out strong. Apple has signed a deal with Steven Spielberg to develop Amazing Stories, a reboot of a 1980s sci-fi show of the same name.

This really shakes up the new industry. With lots of money at Apple's disposal they could be an industry game changer. Considering that most of the big players in video now have nothing to do with Hollywood, the next few years will be very interesting as streaming becomes the only way people watch content outside of reality tv, sports, and news. Read more about this deal at this location.

What Makes a Fight Scene Badass

What Makes a Fight Scene Badass

Fight scenes are what make action movies awesome. Making one work is a different story. So what separates the good from the bad? Too much going on can cause the viewer to be confused by everything and not enough will bore them. Knowing the emotion you want to convey from the fight scene is as important as the work in crafting the scene itself.

Youtuber Aaron Field takes a look at the Kingsman and explains what works about its fight scenes.

DP Henry Braham on Work for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

DP Henry Braham on Work for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 was a great film filled with incredible Special FX and great camera work. A big part of the good camera work was from DP Henry Braham who chose to use a RED Weapon 8K Vista Vision as his camera of choice. The camera was a prototype at the time, which means it was a big risk to use it.

Read more about this and other techniques used for the movie in an interview with Henry Braham in filmmaker magazine.

School: Harnessing Shadows

School: Harnessing Shadows

There's so much that goes into crafting the perfect lighting or lack thereof. Often times the focus is on how to light a subject for a scene, but what about whats not lit? What about the shadows? Ever wonder how this contrast created? How some movies and TV shows can get so dark yet still contain so much detail? Or how silhouettes are created while the background is still well lit? The technique is actually similar to well lit scenes: It's all about the placement of the lights in relation to the subject.

Check out the video below from Rocketjump Film School to find out more:

School: Examining Film Adaptations

School: Examining Film Adaptations

Ever Wonder why books are different than their movie counterparts? The expression 'the book was so much better' is often uttered by fans of the book. This is often due to movies being compressed into a short amount of time rather than an epic adventure, story elements sometimes need to be rearrange to make more sense to audiences, and sometimes climaxes are exaggerated for a more dramatic effect on screen.

Youtube Channel Lessons from the Screenplay look at the movie Arrival and how it was adapted from a book to its screenplay. Warning this contains spoilers of the movie. Watch the video below:

School: The Art of Black and White Movies

School: The Art of Black and White Movies

In today's world where we are trying to get CGI effects to look as real as possible to recreate characters of the past, why would anyone want to watch a black and white film? It looks nothing like real life, but in many cases that's it's biggest strength.

Black and white film is an art form that offers a different perspective with more contrast. YouTube channel Rocket Jump Film School illustrates this further in the video below:

School: The Secret Behind Chase Scenes

School: The Secret Behind Chase Scenes

Car chase scenes are always insane to follow, yet somehow we can always understand whats going on. The series Fast and the Furious is filled with these. I wonder how the movies make any sense at all. Well there is an art to creating these scenes. Using fast cutaways and multiple angles the visuals enhance the action on screen.

With all this action and chaos it's important to know how to keep the viewer engaged and not confused. Youtube series Frame by Frame crashes head first into this chaos in the video below:

Tips: How to Film An Epic Battle

Tips: How to Film An Epic Battle

Epic battles are often the climax of fantasy movies. take a look at Braveheart, Lord of the Rings, 300, or a Game of Thrones episode to see what I am talking about. These scenes of mayhem are carefully crafted and have a structure to them.

Youtuber Nerdwriter made a video explaining how these intricate scenes are created and strung together. Check it out below:

School: Cuts & Transitions 101

School: Cuts & Transitions 101

Curious about making your cuts count or transitioning from scene to scene more effectively? Or are you new to editing and want to learn about it? Well you are in luck! Rocket Jump Film School has created a video examining the different cutting and transitioning techniques commonly used in film. Such as showing time lapse, phone conversations, thoughts, and other techniques.

Watch the Rocket Jump Film School video below to learn more about cuts and transitions:

School: How Michael Bay Creates Bayhem

School: How Michael Bay Creates Bayhem

MIchael Bay, famous for intense action films and explosions, lots and lots of explosions. Some people feel the style is cliched, easy, lazy, formulated, and just too expected now. The thing is not everyone is Michael Bay. He's great at what he does and we've come to know what to expect. There's definitely a certain timing to his style of film making.

Youtube channel Ever Frame a Painting takes an in depth look into how and why he creates his shots. Take a look at the video below:

Tips: Make Your Transitions Count!

Tips: Make Your Transitions Count!

An important part of story telling is transitions from one scene to another. The same holds true for film making. Well thought out transitions can evoke emotions and convey a message. a bunch of fast flashes can create confusion and possibly a sense of mystery while slower scene transitions can create a more peaceful flow.

Scott Pilgrim vs The World contains many uses of creative transitions. Check out this breakdown of some of the transitions in Scott Pilgrim vs The World and why they work so well:

Tips: Virtual Reality the Future of Movies

Tips: Virtual Reality the Future of Movies

Movies are becoming more immersive experiences. From 3D and Imax to 4D and Virtual Reality experiences, film makers have additional challenges when it comes to these different platforms. VR is the latest technology of these and is becoming more widely used with the success of the Occulus Rift and adapters for cellphones.

Everyone wants VR, but how much more work does it take to create such an experience? Do you create an experience where you can move freely and look around like a video game? Does the movie just become a video game? is it just a huge screen in front and around you thatyou can just look at? Kyle, from the youtube series Frame by Frame, explores some these methods in his latest video below:

Tips: Lenses and Perspective

Tips: Lenses and Perspective

There's a common saying "we'll fix it in post," there's a problem with this attitude. Though many things can be fixed in post production (especially in sound), not everything in video can easily be fixed without reshooting the scene. Decisions made at the start of filming can save time later on. Such as shooting in the right perspective or choosing the right lens. 

Another misconception is that the lenses can solve perspective problems. The lens may make someone look bigger or smaller in the overall picture, but what is capture is still a certain distance away from the viewer and that will always be seen. 

The video below disproves this myth with a bunch of different examples in addition to detailed explanations:

Tips: Forced Perspective in The Lord of the Rings

Tips: Forced Perspective in The Lord of the Rings

Lord of the Rings is a classic fantasy tale. When it was brought to life in the movies it captured everything magical about the book. Director Peter Jackson had a vision for the film as epic as the books. Now over a decade and a half old it's important to know what made it as timeless as the books.

Considering the high cost of the trilogy (about 300 million each), you have to wonder where the money went. Well consider that elaborate sets were built for the movie and then they needed to make two of them. The films were shot using a variety of techniques to show the world as hobbits saw it as well as normal height people saw it. These different perspectives were key in adding realism to the film. Watch the video below to learn more about some of the techniques used:

Tips: Notes to a First Time Director

Tips: Notes to a First Time Director

Are you directing a movie for the first time? Or did you want to try it out for your own film? Check out some advice from actors, directors, producers, and writers to new directors in the video below: