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Mixing

Mixing Audio For Beginners - Part 3

Mixing Audio For Beginners - Part 3

Here is the third installment of Mixing Audio For Beginners. If you’ve been following this illuminating compilation of the intricacies and the basics of sound and audio post-production, we’re gonna be addressing further topics taking it from where we left off in the last post about Mixing. Otherwise, we suggest you start off right from the very beginning. So, without further ado, let’s continue.

Ambiance

We mentioned last time that when editing dialogues in a studio through ADR, it is no less than pivotal to create the right environment for recording new lines. Every time a sound professional is tasked with re-recording lines and additional dialogue in a studio, they always have to pay special attention to several aspects that, if overlooked, could ruin the pace of the scene. Each dialogue edit inevitably comes with several challenges, like the gaps in the background environmental sound.

There’s nothing more unpleasant than listening to audio or a soundtrack where the background ambiance doesn’t match the action going on from one scene to the other. This phenomenon is highly common during ADR sessions, which is why, aside from helping the talent match the intensity each shot requires, sound professionals also need to edit the background sounds to fill any possible hole in order for the scene to feel homogenous.

The problem is when the production sound crew captures room tone on a specific location and then, once production is finished, the audio post-production crew needs to replace dialogue and fill the holes with room tone. Of course, there are tools to recreate room tones based on noise samples taken from existing dialogue recordings; however, it is indeed one of the most common tasks under the umbrella of audio post-production.

Sound Effects (SFX)

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Whether coming across the perfect train collision sound in a library, creating dog footsteps on a Foley session, using synthesizers to craft a compelling spaceship pursuit, or just getting outside with the proper gear to record the sounds of nature, a sound effects session is the perfect opportunity for sound and audio professionals to get creative.

Sound effects libraries are a great source for small, and even low-budget, audiovisual projects; however, you definitely must not use them in professional films. Some sounds are simply too recognizable, like the dolphin sound every single time a movie, ad or TV show, shows a dolphin. Major film and TV productions use teams to craft and create their own idea of sound effects, which ultimately becomes as important as the music itself, for example. Think about the lightsaber sounds in any Star Wars movie.

After that, additional sounds can be created during a Foley session. Foley, as discussed in other articles, is the art of generating and crafting sounds in a special room full of, well, junk. This incredible assortment of materials allows foley artists to generate all kinds of sounds such as slamming doors, footsteps in different types of surface, breaking glass, water splashes, etc. Moreover, foley artists recreate these sounds in real time, which is why it is normal to have several takes of the same sound in order to find the one that best fits the scene —they are shown the action in a large screen, and then start using the materials they have at hand in order to provide the action with realistic sounds. Need the sound of an arm breaking? Twist some celery. Walking in the desert? Use your fists and a bowl of corn starch.

Music

Just like with sound effects libraries, when it comes to music, sound professionals have two choices based on their talks with production —they can either use a royalty-free music library, or they can, alongside music composers, create a score for the film entirely from scratch. Be that is it may, the director and productions are the ones who have the final say over what type of music they want to use in the project and, perhaps more importantly, where and when music is present throughout the moving images.

Sometimes video editors resort to creating music edits to make a scene more compelling. Other times, it’s up to sound professionals to make sure the music truly fits into the beat and goes in accordance with what is happening. The trick is to make the accents coincide with the pace of the on-screen moving images as the director instructed, and that music starts and ends where and when it’s supposed to.

Mixing

Assembling all the elements mentioned in the first two parts of this mini guide and this article into a DAW timeline and balancing each track and different group of sounds into a homogeneous soundtrack is perhaps where this fine art reaches its pinnacle. Depending on the size of the studio, it is possible to use more than one workstation and different teams working together simultaneously to balance the sheer array of sounds they’ve got to put in place.

*The images used on this post are taken from Pexels.com

Mixing Audio For Beginners - Part 1

Mixing Audio For Beginners - Part 1

Have you ever wondered why your favorite films or TV shows sound so good? Or why TV ads and commercials are sometimes so much louder than other films and TV series? Or why that internet video that you like the sound so bad?

In this mini-guide, we want to go through the intricacies commonly associated with the creation of sound, audio, and soundtracks for both video and film. Crafting and mixing audio for film and video is a rather profound issue; covering all the basics would take hundreds of pages, due to the constantly changing nature of this business and the technology involved.

This first part covers basic aspects, a bit of background, some terms and terminology, and hopefully, will serve as a clear guide to understanding what mixing audio for video and moving images is about.

The World Of Audio For Video

Way back in the ages of the past century, recording engineers would often face a daunting dichotomy: they often had to make a career choice between either producing music or producing sound and audio for visuals and moving images, such as TV series, Ads, Films, etc. Since the aforementioned career choices were considered specialized assignments, they demanded specialized tools get everything done.

The inclusion of computerized digital audio systems in the late 80s made it possible, and definitely much easier, to use the exact same recording tools to produce and edit both music and soundtracks. Perhaps, if you’ve had any experience with audio post-production, tools, and systems such as AVID, NED PostPro and the early pro tools might ring a bell. That era marked the beginning of a new dynamism where terms such as convergence —where the lines of both worlds of audio and video production intertwine— started to become popular. As a result, the vast majority of engineers had to learn to do audio post-production sessions during the day and music sessions at night.

Be that as it may, the process has undoubtedly evolved throughout the years, and the modern and contemporary process of audio post-production has changed more than ever before.

Types Of Audio Post Production

In order for us to discuss the types of audio post-production, we need to start by making a necessary distinction between what is commonly referred to as audio and other types of soundtracks like radio commercials, audiobooks or the well-known podcast. Though a lot falls under the umbrella of audio post-production, we commonly mean by audio post-production as the audio especially crafter for a moving image or a visual component. Here are the most traditional forms:

Television

TV shows can be practically any length, but the vast majority of US TV programs are intended to last between 30 to 60 minutes. Many are produced by highly qualified and experienced TV studios in Los Angeles. As for Reality Shows, although these can be shot and recorded anywhere, they also require a good and experienced audio post-production team to mix both audio and video in a professional fashion.

Film

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Films vary in their nature. Short films can span just a few minutes, whereas longer films can last several hours. This category includes today’s production for Netflix, HBO, and Amazon, as well as the famous traditional major studios. When talking about a film, it is also important to mention the financial aspect: independent filmmakers, known for producing small to no-budget projects still require an important dose of audio post-production. In fact, many sound engineers are fond of taking on these projects as it serves as the perfect opportunity to get some training prior to taking the big leap.

Commercials

Commercials include several types of visual projects. The term “commercials” often refers to TV commercials, infomercials, ads, promos, political ads, etc. The nature of the aforementioned types of commercials is basically known for its rather short format —today, it is possible to come across commercials ranging from 5 to 60 seconds in length. There are of course much longer commercials; however, it is rather expensive pretending to buy airtime for something longer than sixty seconds.

Video games

Video games are extremely fun. And crafting audio for video games is even funnier. The vast majority of top-quality games, also known as AAA games, have behind a dedicated audio post-production team responsible for creating and capturing the sounds that will be included in the game. This, of course, is absolutely unique to every single game, and certainly demands a daunting amount of work, requiring hundreds of audio files, as the game will demand soundtracks in different languages, which ultimately increases the number of files the audio team will need to manage.

Audio Workflow

The process through which a piece of audio work completes initiation to completion is known as a workflow. And although we will get into more detail in a subsequent post, a traditional audio workflow is comprised of the following stages: pre-production, production, video editing, data import, spotting, dialogue, ADR, ambiance, sound effects, music, mixing, delivery, summary.

*The images used on this post are taken from Pexels.com

Gear: Top 7 Audio Products at NAMM

Gear: Top 7 Audio Products at NAMM

Every year music and audio companies showcase their products at NAMM.

1: Sennheiser Ambeo VR Mic
This mic is perfect for filmmakers looking to record in VR. Being compatible with a GoPros is a huge bonus. Learn more about it at this location in the video below:

2: Townshed Labs Sphere MIcrophone
This is a new large diaphragm condenser mic that emulates high end vintage and modern microphones. Unlike other mic simulators, this one has it's modeling inside it's plugin software, which is also UAD compatible, and has two capsules to help emulate polar patterns, proximity effect, and off axis response. for more information Check out the video below by pro tools expert:

3: Antelope Audio Orion 32 HD
Antelope audio is known for it's high end A/D conversion and clocking. Their newest interface includes pro tools HD connectivity, MADI, USB3, ADAT, SPDIF and 32 analog i/o. probably one of the most flexible interfaces i've seen. on top of all of this it has DSP plugins built in from high end brands like BAE, which emulates their 1073 neve clones. for more information check out this ask audio article.

4/5: Slate Virtual Recording Studio
Slate Digital has announced it's own interface and new microphone to it's Virtual MIcrophone System line. The new mic is a small diaphragm condenser that can also emulate dynamic mics. They are selling the new interface and mics as a bundle. the bundle is being called the virtual recording studio. Definitely a big bang for the buck for those looking to record drums and bands. Though the mics don't emulate the high end features of the Townsend Labs Sphere, they still sound great. The best part about this bundle is the low latency of the interface. At .7ms latency at 96khz this is as good as the pro tools HDX system without the need for a card on an Mac. Watch the announcement demo for more information:

6: Apollo Twin Quad
UAD's Apollo series are one of the more popular interfaces. The two channel Twin was also underpowered, until now. With it's mk2 release it has been boosted to quad, which is double the power of the old interfaces. Additionally, they improved the circuitry for a cleaner sound. for more information check out Ask Audio's article and video.

7: Softtube Console One mk2
Console One has always been a piece of gear I've eyed. a control surface that feels like a console. The problem was always that it didn't have enough plugins that would support it. Well with the mk2 version this is no longer the case. It now supports most UAD plugins. on top of that it has a price decrease to 499. for more information on this product read this article about it.